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A New Push for Fan Freedom

A new bipartisan bill has been dropped in Annapolis to try to remove restrictions on the ability of fans to sell or give away tickets to concerts and sporting events.

SB700 is co-sponsored by Senate Minority Leader J.B. Jennings and Montgomery County Senator Brian Feldman. The synopsis of the bill describes as follows:

Prohibiting a ticket seller or an operator of a ticket seller’s Web site from prohibiting the transfer of a specified ticket, requiring an additional fee for the transfer of a specified ticket, or requiring a purchaser of a ticket to present specified identification or a specified credit card to gain entry to an entertainment event

So why does this bill need to be supported? To remove barriers from legal ticketholders from being able to sell or transfer their tickets to somebody else. There is nothing that would stop Ticketmaster, a venue, or a team from putting restrictions in place that would stop you from legally giving away or selling your tickets. For example, in some cases you would need to present the credit card that purchased the ticket in order to gain admittance. In some instances you can resell your tickets on the secondary market, but often times only through the “preferred vendor” of that team or venue.

The Maryland Consumer Rights Council together this helpful document to better explain why this is an important issue.

 

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This is a bill that, even in this kind of political climate, makes sense for consumers. Particularly as it relates to the fact that several teams are playing in state-owned venue. It will be interesting to see how much support this legislation gets, and hopefully common sense will prevail for legislation that is both pro-free market and pro-consumer…






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