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Looking for a Coward Mrs. O’Malley? Try at Home.

The Associated Press quoted Maryland’s first lady Katie O’Malley telling the National Conference on LGBT Equality in Baltimore, “We didn’t expect things that happened to the House of Delegates to occur, but sadly they did, and there were some cowards that prevented it from passing.”

O’Malley later issued a statement regretting her choice of words.

Delegate Jay Walker (D-PG) said O’Malley’s statement was unsatisfactory

“Call me a coward, but I’m going to stand by my faith and my principles, as well as on my constituents’ beliefs. Forget politics, my mom and dad did not raise a coward.”

In one fail swoop Mrs. O’Malley alienated the crucial votes her husband needs to pass gay marriage legislation, and belittled the deeply held moral and philosophical convictions of those who oppose gay marriage.

Standing on your principles isn’t cowardice Mrs. O’Malley. It’s just another lame euphemism concocted to disparage those who disagree with you and your husband.

Then there is the hypocrisy factor.

Here is Mrs. O’Malley’s husband tweeting “You have to have the guts to make the cuts and the foresight to make the investments.”

Of course Governor O’Malley hasn’t cut anything. O’Malley’s budgets have grown 16 percent since he first took office in 2007. His FY 2012 budget featured one of the largest general fund spending increases in the nation, and his FY 2013 general fund general fund budget increases by nearly $1 million.

In fact, Governor O’Malley was so courageous that in his FY 2013 budget presentation—containing 38 Power Point slides—he never bothered to mention the $35.9 billion total budget figure. A profile in courage indeed!

So Mrs. O’Malley, if you’re looking for a coward try looking for the one in your own home.






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