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Martin O’Malley – Energy Proposal is Whistling in the Dark

Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley wants a cleaner, brighter, sunshinier Maryland. Don’t you?

Most Marylanders would say no if it means paying even more for energy. O’Malley, never one to accept the concept of a free market, believes that you should pay more – and be happy about it.

O’Malley’s latest energy proposal seems to be a doppelganger for his fiscal policy – claim some sort of “doomsday” is coming and make working Marylanders pay more. Led by the O’Malley cheerleading section at the Baltimore Sun, O’Malley wants to increase energy production in Maryland. How? Natural gas fired “peaker plants”, wind and solar.

Why? Because Maryland currently imports over 30% of its electricity. Why? Because power is more expensive to produce in Maryland – due in large part to a carbon tax levied by O’Malley and his fellow nanny staters.

Two years ago we predicted that O’Malley’s “energy plan” (a kind euphemism for price controls) would result in rolling blackouts. Since that time, O’Malley has changed his tune on energy policy numerous times – price controls, a $100 million fund only Al Gore would love, against price controls (after he seized the PSC), and now his new “Doomsday” scenario of produce more expensive power in Maryland or face darkness.

The only part of O’Malley’s plan that makes any sense is his proposal to allow charging of rates based on peak usage times. Given that this is a common sense, market based, solution we expect this portion of the plan to be an early casualty.

We certainly couldn’t expect a common sense, and economically advantageous, solution like encouraging new coal fired plants. I guess O’Malley thinks that he’s too smart to copy his neighbors in Virginia.

cross posted at Delmarva Dealings






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