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Ehrlich Spokesman Stopped By Dixon For Bumper Sticker?

Unfree State

A spokesman for former Gov. Robert Ehrlich Jr. says he experienced a scene right out of George Orwell’s “1984” when driving in Baltimore City last year, according Sun Columnist Laura Vozzella.

While sitting at a red light, Greg Massoni says a black SUV sitting behind him suddenly lit up flashing police lights, and within seconds a city police officer was rapping on his window. When Massoni rolled down his window and asked what he did, he says the officer told him that Mayor Sheila Dixon wanted a word with him.

A stunned Massoni got out of his vehicle, only to have Dixon roll down her window in the back seat and scold him for a bumper sticker on the back of his Expedition, which read:”Don’t believe O’Malley.”

Massoni says he disagreed with Dixon, and then went on his way.

A Dixon spokesman denied the story, but Massoni once again confirmed the story for the Sun.

The most disturbing thing about this story, if it is accurate, is that Dixon and her police driver apparently never heard of the First Amendment. The notion of having a police officer stop someone because of a bumper sticker is an unjustified intimidation used by police states throughout the world.

I wonder how many times Dixon has done this, and I wonder if the driver isn’t someone who used to be the a former aide to a governor, how they would have been treated?

I also find it hard to believe that Massoni would have any reason to make up such a story, and sit on it since November of 2007.

What do you think? Does this kind of action by Dixon promote tourism to Charm City, or does it make you want to check your bumper stickers before you go to Baltimore?

Crossposted on UnfreeState.com






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