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Bad Day for Marylanders

Looks like the State Senate forgot it’s common sense on the way to the chamber today, not once….:

The Maryland Senate has revived a statewide ban on driving while using a hand-held cell phone.

The legislation, long sought by lawmakers who say it’s needed to protect public safety, appeared dead last week when the chamber voted to limit the bill to prohibit only reading or sending text messages on wireless communications devices while behind the wheel. Senators today voted 25-22 to restore the broader ban on talking and texting.

…but twice:

The Maryland Senate mustered the votes today to approve the use of speed cameras in highway work zones and in local jurisdictions that want them in neighborhoods and near schools, while lawmakers in the House argued over a similar measure.

The bill, which was proposed by Gov. Martin O’Malley’s administration, was approved by the Senate 26-21 without debate.

It’s amazing that the General Assembly would pass such legislation that has little impact in improving the safety of Maryland’s highways. Sure, the concept of a hand-held cell-phone ban sounds like something that would improve driver safety, but statistically that’s not the case. And we all know that red-light and speed cameras are nothing more than revenue enhancers for localities that actually may increase (not decrease) driver safety in areas where the cameras are being used.

Let’s face it; this legislation is of no benefit to the citizenry of Maryland.

It’s also amazing that, given the financial and budgetary problems our state has, that the Senate would pass such poppycock that could further put financial and other burdens on the people of Maryland while doing nothing to deal with the important issues that are currently before legislators…

(Crossposted)






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