Please disable your Ad Blocker to better interact with this website.

Sheila Dixon Wins

Okay, this is not a big surprise. According to the most recent returns she beat Keiffer Mitchell and the rest of the field like rented mules.

With 98 percent of the city’s precincts reporting, Dixon had 50,639 votes, or 63 percent, compared with 18,965 votes, or 24 percent, for City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr.

Over at the Baltimore Sun is was a veritable Minneapolis Airport men’s room of praise for the ethically challenged and dubiously competent Dixon.

Nearly eight months ago, Sheila Dixon was ushered into the role of mayor under the specter of lingering ethical questions and doubts that she had the skills and temperament needed to shepherd Baltimore through a turbulent time.

Yesterday, despite those initial reservations, Dixon was swept into office. Election returns last night showed Dixon easily beating her six opponents to become the city’s first elected female mayor and one of just two African-American women leading the country’s 100 largest cities.

Political observers and elected officials say Dixon has managed to deftly and decisively respond to problems in the city’s police and fire departments while promoting community-friendly programs, such as her “clean and green” initiative.

Ooookay, if anyone wants to fill me in on the deft and decisive response to problems in the police and fire departments I’m all ears.

The sad fact is that Baltimore, again, has the mayor it deserves. Only 28% of the eligible voters turned out demonstrating conclusively that competence and honesty really aren’t important to Baltimore residents. In both the mayors race and the race for city council president the voters of Baltimore had real choices. In my view, they chose very badly and I hope they are made to live with those choices.






Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.

Send this to friend