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On Blowing One’s Own Horn

When I commanded a light infantry company my boss, a lieutenant colonel from Auburn, AL, had a unique philosophy on blowing your own horn. Blow your own horn, he would say, or someone will take it, turn it into a funnel and shove it…well, you know.

Below my colleague Brian Griffiths writes about the role political blogs played in the recent kerfuffle surrounding the internal power struggle of the Anne Arundel County GOP.

He is much too modest. From the Baltimore Sun:

Among those leading the charge is Brian Griffiths, a 27-year-old who lost a bid for a Central Committee seat last fall and has been blogging for more than two years at brian griffiths.com. He obtained and posted a letter sent by the Central Committee’s vice chairman asking Collins to step down, and later displayed Collins’ rebuttal. And he challenged key players to explain themselves on his site, offering to post their responses unedited.

“Something just didn’t smell right to me,” Griffiths said. “… I wanted to know, ‘Why is this happening?’ And it’s kinda snowballed from there.”

The constant discussion among conservative commentators — including former candidates and other operatives — allowed interested political observers to become a fly on the wall in what has become a nasty struggle over leadership of a body of elected activists whose work typically involves organizing events, fundraising and identifying candidates.

Brian succeeded in adding transparency to a process despite a lot of folks, including blogs, telling him to 1) shut up and 2) that he didn’t know what he was talking about. If the GOP is going to start winning outside a few areas we are going to have to do more of what Brian has done.






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