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Call Me a NIMBY

They’re moving father’s grave to build a sewer.
They’re moving it regardless of expense!
They’re shifting his remains
To put in 9-inch drains
To irrigate some plush bloke’s residence.

There is an increasing probability, absent Congressional action that the Antietam Battlefield will have a new feature added: a major high voltage transmission line.

According to the description in the Washington Post:

The approximately 300-mile transmission line would start at a coal plant in Winfield, W.Va., pass through Bedington, W.Va., and end at a substation to be built in Kemptown, Md.

Its specific route has not been determined, but it would likely cut through environmentally sensitive and historically significant terrain, which includes the Potomac and Kanawha rivers, the scenic Allegheny Highlands and the Civil War battlefields at Antietam and South Mountain.

The Department of Energy drawings are here.

So what is our Congressional delegation doing?

U.S. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin’s office said he would continue to review the issue “as the process moves forward,” while the office of his fellow Democrat, U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski, did not return telephone messages.

Lisa Wright, a spokeswoman for U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-6th, said the congressman would try to come up with a compromise that would provide electricity and preserve the battlefield.

This is more than likely a done deal. In the future, when those few with any interest in the history of the nation care to visit Antietam, or Monocacy, or South Mountain you’ll get to see more just some boring battlefields and a boring visitor’s center and some boring cannons. You’ll get to see power pylons.

Most of life’s truths can be found in the lyrics to Irish drinking songs.






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